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rabioheab:

i don’t understand why people always say that the mona lisa is leonardo da vinci’s best work. i really liked his role in titanic and he was pretty good in inception too. 






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One Direction Singing What Makes You Beautiful with puppies!


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ultralaser:

a few thoughts that occurred to me while i was thinking about lilo and stitch in the shower.
first, this is the least whitewashed disney movie.  more even than mulan and the emperor’s new groove, which are set in ancient china and the incan empire well before the europeans showed up, but freely mix in american anachronisms to spice up those apparently boring cultures, lilo and stitch is set in the usa, but there’s only one white character and she’s somehow not the hero.
of the dozen-odd humans, there is the white girl who lilo gets in a fight with at school, then lilo nani david and all the townspeople who are hawaiian, then cobra bubbles.  there are white tourists played for laughs almost as much as the americans in triplets of belleville, but also legitimate voice given to the fact that native hawaiians are dependent on those tourists (and their fickle moods) to make a decent living.  then there are all the aliens, none of whom are white people with bumpy noses or big ears.
not to mention that pleakley is gay, and while lilo and nani have a rad beach house, it’s old and rundown, and they’re clearly struggling to get by and not merely in an ‘oh we can only buy one brand new SUV this year’ hollywood way, but ‘i don’t have a job or a huge savings account to fall back on’, ‘child services are about to take away my kid sister’, ‘like all disney heroines i am missing one or more parents, but this time it’s actually talked about’, real-world struggling.
more pointedly, though (and this is where lilo and stitch is more subversive than even aladdin), is that from the perspective of the galactic federation?  jumba is a misanthropic political agitator who’s turned against society and works to undermine it, by way of his greatest creation, an illegal genetic experiment designed and bred solely to destroy everything in it’s path.
stitch is a terrorist.
gantu is jack bauer, and his eye-for-an-eye absolutism is plainly shown to be wrong.  his zeal to capture stitch results in collateral damage and he is punished for his errors.  stitch is arrested, but ultimately released, to be with his family, who need him as much as he needs them, because though he has done great violence, he is still a person, and deserves to be treated as one.
stitch, the terrorist, and jumba, his creator / mentor, are ‘defeated’ by learning about love and family, and facing down their own anger and learning how to contribute something positive to the world.  they aren’t imprisoned or executed or tortured or locked away in a psych ward, they are reintegrated into society, and while it’s all very pat and cutesy, the message still comes across clearly.
this is a disney movie that is critiquing the war on terror.

ultralaser:

a few thoughts that occurred to me while i was thinking about lilo and stitch in the shower.

first, this is the least whitewashed disney movie.  more even than mulan and the emperor’s new groove, which are set in ancient china and the incan empire well before the europeans showed up, but freely mix in american anachronisms to spice up those apparently boring cultures, lilo and stitch is set in the usa, but there’s only one white character and she’s somehow not the hero.

of the dozen-odd humans, there is the white girl who lilo gets in a fight with at school, then lilo nani david and all the townspeople who are hawaiian, then cobra bubbles.  there are white tourists played for laughs almost as much as the americans in triplets of belleville, but also legitimate voice given to the fact that native hawaiians are dependent on those tourists (and their fickle moods) to make a decent living.  then there are all the aliens, none of whom are white people with bumpy noses or big ears.

not to mention that pleakley is gay, and while lilo and nani have a rad beach house, it’s old and rundown, and they’re clearly struggling to get by and not merely in an ‘oh we can only buy one brand new SUV this year’ hollywood way, but ‘i don’t have a job or a huge savings account to fall back on’, ‘child services are about to take away my kid sister’, ‘like all disney heroines i am missing one or more parents, but this time it’s actually talked about’, real-world struggling.

more pointedly, though (and this is where lilo and stitch is more subversive than even aladdin), is that from the perspective of the galactic federation?  jumba is a misanthropic political agitator who’s turned against society and works to undermine it, by way of his greatest creation, an illegal genetic experiment designed and bred solely to destroy everything in it’s path.

stitch is a terrorist.

gantu is jack bauer, and his eye-for-an-eye absolutism is plainly shown to be wrong.  his zeal to capture stitch results in collateral damage and he is punished for his errors.  stitch is arrested, but ultimately released, to be with his family, who need him as much as he needs them, because though he has done great violence, he is still a person, and deserves to be treated as one.

stitch, the terrorist, and jumba, his creator / mentor, are ‘defeated’ by learning about love and family, and facing down their own anger and learning how to contribute something positive to the world.  they aren’t imprisoned or executed or tortured or locked away in a psych ward, they are reintegrated into society, and while it’s all very pat and cutesy, the message still comes across clearly.

this is a disney movie that is critiquing the war on terror.